Trade stocks – Radar 2014 http://radar2014.org/ Fri, 20 May 2022 01:43:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://radar2014.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-32-120x120.png Trade stocks – Radar 2014 http://radar2014.org/ 32 32 Can you trade stocks using the popular MetaTrader 5 platform? https://radar2014.org/2022/05/18/can-you-trade-stocks-using-the-popular-metatrader-5-platform/ Wed, 18 May 2022 09:46:09 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/05/18/can-you-trade-stocks-using-the-popular-metatrader-5-platform/ Stocks are considered accessible and attractive instruments by many traders, simply because many brokers cover these assets. At the same time, some traders are not so familiar with more “complex” assets like bonds, which shows that many traders, especially novices, are looking for simplicity. Fiat currencies continue to lose purchasing power, so if you trade […]]]>

Stocks are considered accessible and attractive instruments by many traders, simply because many brokers cover these assets. At the same time, some traders are not so familiar with more “complex” assets like bonds, which shows that many traders, especially novices, are looking for simplicity.

Fiat currencies continue to lose purchasing power, so if you trade regularly, you should consider ways to protect your capital. Stock trading is convenient, but is it as accessible as it seems? Do major trading platforms, such as MetaTrader 5, allow stock trading?

Stocks on the rise

The answer to this question is a clear “yes” – and that’s good news. The past few weeks have seen global equities make an impressive comeback. After several months of underperformance, driven by strong fears of inflation, the normalization of monetary policy, rising commodity prices and the latest conflict between Ukraine and Russia, equities are again very requested.

Short sellers are squeezed out of the market, causing valuations to rise rapidly. Apple stock, for example, is up 11 straight gains. Other tech names like Amazon, Google, Facebook and Tesla are also up, although the growing sector is widely expected to perform poorly at a time of rising interest rates.

Some say this is a bearish rally, while others suggest that stocks could continue to rise in the coming months, given that real interest rates are still deep in negative territory. The good news for you, however, is that these assets remain heavily traded, so plenty of opportunities may arise down the road.

Reputable brokers offering MT5

First, you need to choose a broker that covers the popular MetaTrader 5. This shouldn’t be difficult though, as the number of reputable brands currently offering access to this platform is increasing, and one of the latest names to do the same goes for easyMarkets.

Recent news from the company indicates that the already solid selection of platforms continues to be expanded. The recently added MT5 platform comes on top of its proprietary web and mobile software, MT4 and TradingView. With its MetaTrader 5 integration, easyMarkets now offers clients access to variable spreads and competitive margin requirements.

MT5 is an upgraded version of the popular MT4 and is a multi-asset trading platform. You can easily trade global stocks on MT5, largely due to the range of trading tools available.

Find your way with trading tools

When uncertainty rises, traders should monitor different variables, such as volatility, interest rate spreads, outperforming sectors, geopolitical developments and others.

More often than not, these are subjective factors that can be interpreted differently by each trader. While it can add risk to the equation, technical analysis can complement fundamental analysis and remove some of that subjectivity.

With MetaTrader 5 you get access to dozens of built-in indicators, multiple timeframes, a strategy tester and many other resources. It is possible to open up to 100 charts simultaneously, drawing indicators according to your strategy.

Access to the MQL5 programming language allows you to design Expert Advisors, while also providing the ability to purchase EAs from the community. Automating the trading process is something many traders think about these days.

]]>
I used to trade stocks with my grandmother. Here’s what she taught me about money management https://radar2014.org/2022/05/02/i-used-to-trade-stocks-with-my-grandmother-heres-what-she-taught-me-about-money-management/ Mon, 02 May 2022 10:02:41 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/05/02/i-used-to-trade-stocks-with-my-grandmother-heres-what-she-taught-me-about-money-management/ It was around 2004/2005. I was in college and living with my grandparents. “Check the dividend yield, honey,” my grandmother said at the kitchen table. I scanned and replied, “This one is at three percent.” “Now let’s look at the returns of their competitors and see who has consistently increased their dividend. And, also manages […]]]>

It was around 2004/2005. I was in college and living with my grandparents.

“Check the dividend yield, honey,” my grandmother said at the kitchen table.

I scanned and replied, “This one is at three percent.”

“Now let’s look at the returns of their competitors and see who has consistently increased their dividend. And, also manages the price/earnings ratio, my dear. This is so that we can compare well.

“Above!”

“Oh and by the way, did you see any red flags (other than no dividend) with WestJet stock when you read the MD&A?” asked my grandmother.

“Not at the moment. They seem like a welcome competitor in the market with a strong growth strategy. Eventually they will have to pay a dividend to investors,” I said.

“It’s okay. I’m going to add more shares today and take some profit off the table,” my grandmother said as she sipped her tea.

I followed his strategy and made enough money to pay my tuition the following year.

In the evenings, I read my finance and marketing textbooks to her (she had lost her sight a few years earlier) and she was my sounding board for my stock trading project – a dividend investing strategy – during from my last semester of college. Nana and I passed the course.

Fast forward to 2022.

My grandmother, Velma Scorgie, died last week at the age of 100.

She was one of the first financial feminists and shaped much of what I know about money today. In her twenties, she held a finance job on Bay Street until she became pregnant and her role was abruptly eliminated. But that hasn’t stopped her from continuing her financial education, investing and ensuring that her children and grandchildren become financially savvy themselves.

Here’s what she taught me about money.

Women are great investors

It wasn’t the norm for women to decide household investments 50 or 75 years ago, but my grandfather and Nana clearly knew she was better equipped to make those decisions. An avid reader and junkie of numbers, my Nana was the queen of compiling technical and fundamental market analysis and finding specific stocks that suited their balanced growth investment strategy.

On each payday, she allocated 20% of their money to their investments (always keeping tax mitigation opportunities in mind), met with the bank quarterly to review market conditions and performance, ran buying and selling decisions and ensuring that she and my grandfather would be well prepared for retirement at age 65.

Yes, she was definitely discriminated against along the way, especially when she brought her three little sons to investment appointments while my grandfather was working, but she overcame that and moved on.

It turns out that research shows that women, when given the opportunity to learn key investment skills, actually outperform their male counterparts in terms of returns, which is precisely what my grandma was doing. -mother.

Budget like a boss (mom)

My grandmother used two tools to help her budget at the time: a checkbook register to keep track of each transaction and a graph paper where she would show the household’s forecast of expenses for the coming month: mortgage, groceries, children’s clothing. children, etc. on. She often placed these two budgeting tools side by side to compare what she intended to do and how it ended up happening.

Today, we use budget templates and expense tracking tools in spreadsheets. But, the basic skill of spending within one’s means remains the same. According to my Nana, they just didn’t really have the ability to overspend because there were considerably fewer borrowing tools at that time. Imagine what it would look like today with no credit card space or emergency lines of credit – #Gulp.

I copied my grandmother’s budgeting strategy during my college years, living with her and working part-time (as a cashier at RBC) while going to class, and it worked like a charm. I even made sure that before paying anything, I put some money aside for my future. This cash reserve came in handy after graduation when I used it to buy my first house at age 21. And I always made sure my budget had room for fun because “that’s money,” my grandma used to say.

Give while you live

Before I entered university, my grandmother revealed to her eight grandchildren that she had invested a large sum of money specifically to help pay our school fees. Growing up with zero money in my house, finding out that I would receive financial support for my tuition and books was a financial game-changer for me!

In my grandmother’s opinion, passing on this money was a living investment in her family. “I want to smile at your success and attend your graduations while I’m still alive,” she said. Little did she know that today, early intergenerational giving has become one of the hottest trends in financial planning. It’s a great way to see the money work for the next generation, and in some cases, it can be useful for managing taxes.

(Here’s a fun tidbit: she blocked my grandfather from accessing that particular investment account because no matter what happened to him, she would have 100% control of that money.)

This too should pass

Born during the Great Depression and then raised watching World War II unfold, my grandmother considered resources and life in general to be very precious… almost scarce. I think we’ve all had a taste of that with the pandemic and watching the war break out between Russia and Ukraine.

My grandmother didn’t waste food or money on frivolous things. She used coupons and capitalized on sales to stretch her resources. She has always given money and time to her community. She spent money on books, learning, and traveling later in life because that’s what filled her cup. Sometimes she was a little too frugal; my grandmother didn’t buy a right side mirror on her early 90s Honda Accord. But from her perspective, if the purchase wasn’t going to help her financial health, support her family, or bring her joy, she could do without it: who counts anyway on this right mirror. (Just kidding, vehicle safety is important!)

What I mean is that the world, the markets, our health, the economy… it’s changing rapidly right now, and it’s not for the best. By staying focused on your financial strategy and protecting what’s yours — your family, your money, your community, your job — that’s how we’ll move forward.

Here is the biggest thing I learned from my Nana. She did not leave her future to chance in the hope that a better life would “just happen”. She always had a plan for her money and how she wanted her life to take shape. In this case, it is EXACTLY what it takes to move forward with money, relationships and your career.

]]>
Consumers overwhelmingly trust computer algorithms over humans to trade stocks https://radar2014.org/2022/04/29/consumers-overwhelmingly-trust-computer-algorithms-over-humans-to-trade-stocks/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/29/consumers-overwhelmingly-trust-computer-algorithms-over-humans-to-trade-stocks/ While 93% of respondents manage their own investments, using apps like Robinhood and Stockpile to invest in individual stocks and mutual funds, 2 in 3 respondents said they thought the learning curve for investing was overwhelming. “Making sense of investing can feel like drinking from a fire hose,” said Ryan Panel, Founder and Chief Investment […]]]>

While 93% of respondents manage their own investments, using apps like Robinhood and Stockpile to invest in individual stocks and mutual funds, 2 in 3 respondents said they thought the learning curve for investing was overwhelming.

“Making sense of investing can feel like drinking from a fire hose,” said Ryan Panel, Founder and Chief Investment Officer of Kaiju Capital Management. “AI is a game-changer for investors because it instantly analyzes massive data sets to identify opportunities that no individual manager could predict.”

The biggest concern among respondents is that 69% were unsure if an algorithm could accurately predict human trading behavior. However, 89% of respondents agreed that they would be comfortable with a computer algorithm trading for them if it performed well and was also monitored by an experienced hedge fund management team.

Other survey results:

  • Among the most popular investing apps, 19% of respondents use Robinhood, 16% use Stockpile, and 19% use personal accounts (401KIRA, Roth, etc.)
  • 83% said they were “familiar” or “knowledgeable” about investing
  • 38% are familiar with ETFs, while 50% are familiar with cryptocurrency
  • 55% have negative feelings about hedge funds
  • 92% were pleased that average investors apparently outwitted some traditional Wall Street players in the GameStop stock situation

The survey of 1,000 anonymous American consumers over the age of 18 was conducted using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, the most popular crowdsourcing survey service for scientific purposes.

About Kaiju Capital Management
Kaiju Capital Management, founded in 2013, focuses on two main areas: market-neutral, mathematically proven trading strategies and talent acquisition. Kaiju uses its Reasoning Mechanisms™ – quantitative analysis, behavioral finance, quantum mechanics and artificial intelligence – to achieve consistently high risk-adjusted investment results. For more information, visit KCM.vg.

Follow Kaiju on LinkedIn and Twitter for more information.

All registered and unregistered trademarks are the exclusive property of their respective owners.

Media Contact:
gary bird
Forty-Three, Inc.
831.621.5661
[email protected]

SOURCEKaiju Capital Management

]]>
How to Trade Stocks Before a Recession: Strategist Charles Schwab https://radar2014.org/2022/04/28/how-to-trade-stocks-before-a-recession-strategist-charles-schwab/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 03:19:21 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/28/how-to-trade-stocks-before-a-recession-strategist-charles-schwab/ Charles Schwab’s chief investment strategist tells investors to stay neutral on stocks. Liz Ann Sonders says customers should rebalance often and look for quality and value. She argues that this market is unusually complex and betting on specific trends does not make sense. Investors don’t like to think about the possibility of a recession but […]]]>
  • Charles Schwab’s chief investment strategist tells investors to stay neutral on stocks.
  • Liz Ann Sonders says customers should rebalance often and look for quality and value.
  • She argues that this market is unusually complex and betting on specific trends does not make sense.

Investors don’t like to think about the possibility of a


recession

but Charles Schwab’s Liz Ann Sonders says it’s more likely than many realize.

Sonders is Schwab’s chief investment strategist and helps oversee the $7.87 trillion in client assets the firm manages. She says that the rise in interest rates and the tightening of balance sheets by the


Federal Reserve

combined with relatively weak economic growth, all make a recession more likely than a soft landing where the economy continues to grow.

“If all of these exogenous forces are moving the needle in one direction or another, I think it’s easier to argue that it’s moving the needle more towards recession,” she told Insider on Tuesday. . “The last 13 tightening cycles, 10 ended in a recession, three ended in a soft landing. So the odds are always more favorable for a recession than a soft landing.”

After months of signaling, the Fed began raising interest rates in March and is expected to continue raising rates steadily through 2023. Sonders says these up cycles typically start with an economy much stronger than the current one, which has been losing momentum for months.

This culminated with the startling news on Thursday that the US economy contracted in the first quarter of this year. Experts expected modest growth.

Higher interest rates are likely to further slow the economy by making it more expensive to borrow money.

From the beginning of this economic cycle to its monetary policy, everything was unique even before the war in Ukraine made things even more complicated. And Sonders says investors should fight their impulse to try to spin every development to their advantage — with an anti-inflation trade, a trade up in rates, a bet on growth or against it.

“One of the things we did a few months ago was effectively neutralize our tactical recommendations,” Sonders said. Since February, she hasn’t told investors to overweight tech stocks or underweight energy companies, or favor small caps over large or fixed income over real estate, for example.

Instead, Sonders suggests approaching this environment by favoring quality companies and emphasizing low-priced value stocks.

That means focusing on “positive earnings revisions, positive free cash flow performance, a strong balance sheet and not paying obscene valuation,” she said. “It’s sort of a back-to-basics approach of really investing based on characteristics, instead of making a sector call or two or a broader asset class or two.”

But she doesn’t just tell clients to go neutral and let stocks go from there. Sonders says investors should be careful not to take what the market gives them and rebalance their portfolios more often than usual. It does not recommend a specific timing scheme or frequency.

“Ask your portfolio to tell you when it’s time to rebalance, so you reduce your strength more frequently, adding where there’s weakness,” she said. “It’s more of a broad message about letting


volatility

work in your favour.”

She also warns investors that they might be too focused on inflation right now. While this is unquestionably a significant issue for the economy and the markets, she says investors who steer their portfolios around inflation could miss the chance of it peaking and the momentum changing. drastically, ruining those transactions.

“I think there’s more than just emerging evidence that, sooner than I think a lot of people think, we might start hearing the term ‘supply glut,'” she said. . “We’re starting to pile on the consumer companies that are now talking about maybe having stocked too much now in declining demand.”

Still, Sonders says the disinflation of the past two decades is likely gone, and from here inflation should stay at a higher level, even if that level is not in the reported 8% range. during the last years. month.

]]>
How to Trade Stocks Online: The Beginner’s Guide https://radar2014.org/2022/04/20/how-to-trade-stocks-online-the-beginners-guide/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 23:13:55 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/20/how-to-trade-stocks-online-the-beginners-guide/ An electronic chart showing closing numbers for the Nikkei Stock Average in Tokyo, Japan, March 6, 2020. Shares in Tokyo closed sharply lower on Friday as investor sentiment was risk averse from the start following a a global rout in stocks triggered by escalating concerns about the spread of the coronavirus. (Xinhua/Du Xiaoyi) If you […]]]>

An electronic chart showing closing numbers for the Nikkei Stock Average in Tokyo, Japan, March 6, 2020. Shares in Tokyo closed sharply lower on Friday as investor sentiment was risk averse from the start following a a global rout in stocks triggered by escalating concerns about the spread of the coronavirus. (Xinhua/Du Xiaoyi)

If you are a newbie investor who wants to start trading stocks online, this guide is for you.

We’ll walk you through the process of opening an account, choosing the right stockbroker, and placing your first trade. At the end, you will have everything you need to start trading stocks with confidence.

Opening a brokerage account

The first step in stock trading online opens a brokerage account. A brokerage account is an account that allows you to buy and sell securities such as stocks, bonds and mutual funds. You can open an account with a traditional brick-and-mortar broker, like Charles Schwab or Fidelity, or an online broker, like Robinhood or E*TRADE.

There are a few factors to consider when selecting a broker:

  • Consider the fees: Some brokers charge commissions on each trade, while others charge monthly or annual fees.
  • Think about the investment products you want to trade: Some brokers offer a more complete selection of securities than others.
  • Choose an easy-to-use broker: If you are a beginner, look for a platform with a simple and intuitive interface.

Find the right broker

Once you’ve decided which broker to use, it’s time to open an account. When you open an account, you will be required to provide personal information, such as your name, address, and social security number. You will also be asked to fund your account with a minimum deposit.

Place your first trade

Now that you have a brokerage account and understand the different commands, you are ready to place your first trade. When you are ready to buy or sell a stock, you must enter an order.

An order is simply an instruction given to your broker to buy or sell a security. Limit orders and market orders are the two types of orders available.

  • Market order: A market order is an order to buy or sell a security at the current market price.
  • Limit order: A limit order is an instruction to buy or sell a security at a specific price.

Monitoring your investments

Now that you have chosen a broker and opened an account, it’s time to start trading. Before starting, it is essential to understand the risks. When you invest in a company, you are acquiring a stake in the company and its future performance.

When you buy a stock, you are buying a share of ownership in a company. You expect the company to make money and pay dividends for this investment. There is always a risk that the business will underperform and your investment will lose value.

There are two types of risk to consider when investing in stocks: market risk and individual risk.

  • Market risk: the risk of investing in the stock market in general. This includes factors such as recessions, inflation or interest rates.
  • Individual risk: the risk associated with investing in a specific company. This includes factors such as mismanagement, fraud or low income.

To manage these risks, it is essential to diversify your portfolio. Diversification is the process of spreading your investments across different asset classes and industries. If an investment fails, you are not completely wiped out that way.

Commissions and fees

It is essential to understand the fees involved. When you buy or sell a stock, you will have to pay a commission. A commission is a small fee charged by your broker for each trade. Commissions can vary from $0 to $10 per transaction.

In addition to commissions, you will also have to pay taxes on your profits. You will be liable for capital gains tax when you sell a stock for more than you paid. The tax rate depends on how long you’ve held the stock and your tax bracket.

The essential

Invest in stocks can be a great way to grow your wealth. It is essential to understand the process and the risks involved before you start trading. With a little research and practice, you can be well on your way to becoming a successful investor.

Send your news to newsghana101@gmail.com and via WhatsApp to +233 244244807
To follow Ghana News on Google News

]]>
Members of Congress should not own or trade stock https://radar2014.org/2022/04/20/members-of-congress-should-not-own-or-trade-stock/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/20/members-of-congress-should-not-own-or-trade-stock/ OPINION AND COMMENT Editorials and other opinion content provide insights into issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom reporters. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-California) in 2020. ERIN SCHAFF NYT Few issues in Congress transcend partisan polarization as reliably and consistently as members’ stock portfolios. Americans from […]]]>

OPINION AND COMMENT

Editorials and other opinion content provide insights into issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom reporters.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-California) in 2020.

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-California) in 2020.

NYT

Few issues in Congress transcend partisan polarization as reliably and consistently as members’ stock portfolios. Americans from all ideological backgrounds overwhelmingly agree that their federal officials should not buy and sell securities given their obviously advantageous access to information that is not available to most investors. And judging by the persistence of high market participation on Capitol Hill, members of Congress from both parties agree that they like to take advantage of this privilege to enrich themselves.

The Post-Watergate Ethics in Government Act and the Obama-era STOCK (Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge) Act, which required more frequent disclosure of Congressional dealings, have served primarily to highlight the extent of the problem without doing much. thing to solve it. A recent Insider study found that 59 lawmakers broke the law, which usually results in a minimal fine. Meanwhile, waves of remarkably prescient buying and selling by lawmakers have taken place on the eve of world- and market-shattering events such as the 2008 financial crisis, the 2020 emergence of the novel coronavirus and the Russian invasion of Ukraine this year, suggesting all senators and representatives were making lucrative use of information obtained through their duties.

A surge in pre-pandemic stock dumping prompted the FBI and the Securities and Exchange Commission to open an investigation into four senators. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, finally admitted to failing to disclose a transaction by her late husband and said she would pay a fine, although she maintained that her transactions were not related to the emergence of COVID-19 or any information they may have had. Sen. Richard Burr, RN.C., who has come under further scrutiny based on a wider sellout by himself and a relative, has resigned as the intelligence committee chair. And the scrutiny of former Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., may have helped hand the Senate over to Democrats. But the federal government eventually dropped all investigations without filing charges.

The husband of another California lawmaker, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, is so prolific and successful as an investor that he inspired a following on social media, where amateur investors follow the transactions disclosed by the speaker . The thousands of transactions disclosed by members of Congress, and imitated by those who monitor them, are proven to influence the entire market. Like Burr, who voted against the reform, Pelosi made matters worse by opposing any restrictions on those congressional profits last year, though she has since changed her position.

The cause of Congressional stock trading reform is nearly as popular and bipartisan in theory as members’ pursuit of market riches is in practice, with more than a fifth of lawmakers signing the one of many current reform proposals. As past anemic efforts demonstrate, they have little hope of regaining credibility on the subject if they continue to allow their members and immediate families to own and trade individual stocks.

Requiring members of Congress to limit their investments to diversified funds that do not invite personal dealings and conflicts of interest is not asking much given their unfair advantages over the investing public and the power and the responsibility entrusted to them. The alternative is another reason to be wary of a legislature that Americans already hold in unsustainable esteem.

BEHIND OUR REPORTS

What are editorials and who writes them?

Editorials represent the collective opinion of The Sacramento Bee Editorial Board. They do not reflect the individual opinions of board members or the opinions of Bee reporters in the news section. Bee reporters do not participate in editorial board deliberations or influence board decisions.

The board includes Bee Editor-in-Chief Colleen McCain Nelson, McClatchy California Opinion Editor Marcos Breton, Associate Opinion Editor Josh Gohlke, Associate Editor and Editorial Cartoonist Jack Ohman, Editor opinion assistant Yousef Baig, opinion writer Robin Epley and opinion assistant Hannah Holzer.

We base our opinions on reports from our colleagues in the news section, as well as our own reports and interviews. Our members attend public meetings, call people and follow up on readers’ story ideas, just like journalists do. Unlike journalists, who are objective, we share our judgments and clearly state what we think should happen based on our knowledge.

Find out more by clicking on the arrow at the top right.

tell us what you think

You may or may not agree with our point of view. We believe disagreement is healthy and necessary for a functioning democracy. If you would like to share your own views on important events for the Sacramento area, you can write a letter to the editor (150 words or less) using this formor send an editorial (650-750 words) to opinion@sacbee.com. Due to a high volume of submissions, we are unable to post everything we receive.

Support the Sacramento Bee

These conversations are important to our community. Keep the conversation going by supporting The Sacramento Bee. Subscribe here.

Related Sacramento Bee Stories

]]>
Elizabeth Warren says it’s ‘obvious’ why lawmakers shouldn’t trade stocks ‘whether you’re a Republican senator or the Democratic Speaker of the House’ https://radar2014.org/2022/04/18/elizabeth-warren-says-its-obvious-why-lawmakers-shouldnt-trade-stocks-whether-youre-a-republican-senator-or-the-democratic-speaker-of-the-house/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:20:00 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/18/elizabeth-warren-says-its-obvious-why-lawmakers-shouldnt-trade-stocks-whether-youre-a-republican-senator-or-the-democratic-speaker-of-the-house/ Elizabeth Warren declares prohibiting legislators from negotiating actions should be a top priority for Democrats. She says it’s “obvious” to the American people “whether you’re a Republican senator or the Democratic Speaker of the House.” Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts says the ban on members of Congress trade actions should be a top priority for […]]]>
  • Elizabeth Warren declares prohibiting legislators from negotiating actions should be a top priority for Democrats.
  • She says it’s “obvious” to the American people “whether you’re a Republican senator or the Democratic Speaker of the House.”

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts says the ban on members of Congress trade actions should be a top priority for Democrats ahead of the 2022 midterm elections.

In a New York Times op-ed published on Monday, the liberal promoter and 2020 presidential candidate outlined several priorities that she says can help her party avoid “big losses in the halfway“, including the passage of a reconciliation bill that includes provisions of the original “Build Back Better” climate and social spending bill while delegating certain aspects of this legislation to the executive authority of the president. Joe Biden.

But beyond that, Warren cited polls showing the public has “identified corrupt government officials as a top concern.”

“They’re right,” the Massachusetts Democrat wrote. “To address the pressing challenges we face – climate change, income inequality, systemic injustice – we must stamp out corruption. To begin cleaning up government, members of Congress and their spouses should not be authorized to own or trade individual shares.”

Insiders’ “Conflicted Congress” investigation, which found that nearly 60 members of Congress and more than 180 senior congressional officials failed to promptly disclose their stock trades in accordance with federal law, also documented several instances in which members of Congress served on committees. oversee certain industries even though they were personally invested in those industries.

Warren then made an implied jab at the Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosiwho initially drew criticism for her vehement opposition to a stock trading ban before later warming to the idea, provided her caucus backed her.

“Whether you are a Republican Senator or the Democratic Speaker of the House, it is obvious to the American people that they should not be allowed to trade individual stocks and then vote on laws that affect those companies,” Warren wrote. , noting that his own bill to ban the practice — the “Bipartisan Congressional Stock Ownership Ban Act” — is the most sweeping and currently the only bipartisan bill to ban the practice. the trading of shares in the Senate.

Warren has been among the most aggressive proponents of banning lawmakers from trading individual stocks, telling Insider in February that she would like to see the idea extended to lawmakers and state governors as well.

The senator’s op-ed comes as lawmakers from both chambers seek to reach an agreement on legislation that would address an issue that polls show is hugely popular with the American public.

Following the first House hearing on reforming stock trading rules for lawmakers, 19 bipartisan House members are lobbying the House Administration Committee to steer toward the markup of a bill.

And in the Senate, Democratic Senator Jeff Merkley said all of his fellow Democrats agreed with the basic idea, but argued that time is running out for lawmakers to come to an agreement on a plan, given the nature of a midterm election. year.

]]>
Trading stocks? These forms are needed to file your tax return https://radar2014.org/2022/04/13/trading-stocks-these-forms-are-needed-to-file-your-tax-return/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/13/trading-stocks-these-forms-are-needed-to-file-your-tax-return/ svetikd / iStock.com The past two years have been a confusing time for many when it comes to managing their personal finances. It has become increasingly popular to attempt lucrative new ventures during the pandemic, from unconventional side hustles to studied investment strategies. For stock traders, whether beginners or veterans, there are some quirks that […]]]>

svetikd / iStock.com

The past two years have been a confusing time for many when it comes to managing their personal finances. It has become increasingly popular to attempt lucrative new ventures during the pandemic, from unconventional side hustles to studied investment strategies. For stock traders, whether beginners or veterans, there are some quirks that will require special attention when filing your taxes.

Discover: 11 Ways Warren Buffett Lives Frugally
More: 30 things you should never buy without a coupon

Yes, filing taxes can be easy or frustrating. The one thing that taxes are not is avoidable. Unless your investments are in retirement accounts such as IRAs or 401(k), you must report all stock transactions to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). To do this, you will need to be thorough and gather all the required documents – documents detailing the investment information relating to your stock trading activities (and any associated dividends) for that tax year.

Regardless of your investment behavior – whether you prefer a traditional brokerage service or a mobile platform or application – you must certain documents detailing your trading activities each tax year. You will receive a 1099 document from each company you have done business with (either by mail or by download), so you will have to wait until you have received all of your 1099s before you can properly file your taxes.

1099s are divided into two categories, at least with respect to investment income: the 1099-B is for investment sales and cost basis accounts, including any washout sales violations, and the 1099-DIV relates to dividends and capital gains distributions. Wash sales regulations require the disclosure of all of your and your spouse’s accounts.

For the next year, you should look for other ways to reduce your taxable income, such as contributing to a tax-advantaged retirement account, a health savings account, and turning stock loss into a tax-loss crop. Whether you are heavily invested in stocks or not, a professional tax advisor or software service can help you with these strategies when tax season arrives.

See: POLL: Where have you cut the most because of inflation?
Find: Tax Day 2022: What is the last day to file?

The excitement and allure of trading and making money with stocks should not be dampened by the burden that filing a tax return can entail. Having a solid tax strategy and gathering all the information you will need will not only keep you accountable, but improve the overall experience.

More from GOBankingRates

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: Trade Stocks? These forms are needed to file your tax return

]]>
Should I Trade Stocks or Forex in Nigeria? https://radar2014.org/2022/04/06/should-i-trade-stocks-or-forex-in-nigeria/ Wed, 06 Apr 2022 13:45:33 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/06/should-i-trade-stocks-or-forex-in-nigeria/ Stock trading involves buying shares of a company listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NGX) and selling them back when the value appreciates. Currently, NGX has approximately 241 publicly traded stocks, so traders have plenty of options to choose from. Forex trading, on the other hand, involves using one currency to buy another for purposes […]]]>

Stock trading involves buying shares of a company listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NGX) and selling them back when the value appreciates. Currently, NGX has approximately 241 publicly traded stocks, so traders have plenty of options to choose from.

Forex trading, on the other hand, involves using one currency to buy another for purposes such as speculation and hedging currency risk. Forex trading is done over-the-counter because there is no physical exchange venue. We will compare stock and currency trading in Nigeria using three benchmarks: regulation, liquidity and risk.

For stock trading, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NGX) regulate the activities of all stockbrokers in Nigeria and have the power to sanction them. To start trading stocks, a trader must register with an SEC-licensed stockbroker and download their trading application.

The SEC has also established a National Investor Protection Fund (NIPF) to compensate investors who suffer pecuniary loss when a capital market operator fails to meet its contractual obligations due to bankruptcy, fraudulent acts of the capital market operator or its personnel.

To trade forex by individuals, there are no regulations in place yet. The SEC has said that anyone who engages in retail online forex trading does so at their own risk. In Nigeria, only banks exchange currencies with each other in the interbank market.

Nigerian regulators are of the view that retail traders should refrain from trading foreign exchange. Individuals who have chosen to go ahead and trade forex online at their own risk do so by registering with leading foreign licensed international forex brokers dealing in Nigeria. However, if traders are duped, the SEC cannot intervene because international brokers are not under their authority.

Nigerian forex traders are not eligible to benefit from the NIPF compensation fund if they lose money to a fraudulent international forex broker.

#2. Direct Cash Settlement (DCS):

All stockbrokers in Nigeria are required to implement DCS. To improve transparency, increase speed and end insider abuse and embezzlement of client funds, the SEC in Nigeria has now made DCS mandatory unless a trader opts out.

Prior to the advent of DCS, when a stockbroker sells a trader’s stock, the proceeds are paid into the broker’s account from where the broker transfers it to the client’s account.

However, with DCS, proceeds from sales go directly to the trader’s account without going through the broker’s account. This ensures transparency and is a good regulatory measure. The DCS only applies to SEC-regulated securities brokers in Nigeria. International forex brokers are not mandated to implement DCS as they are not regulated by the SEC.

Every stock is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange, so their prices are determined by the forces of supply and demand. When a company is doing well and showing good earnings, the demand for its shares will be high and the price will also appreciate.

These shares will be more liquid than those of a company that is not doing as well. But in general terms, there is liquidity in the stock market.

In the foreign exchange market, liquidity is very high, in fact it is the most liquid of all the financial markets in the world. The 2019 BIS report estimated daily turnover in the global forex market at $6.6 trillion.

Once you are trading a major currency like EUR/USD, there will always be a ready counterpart. It is easier to sell currencies in the forex market than to sell stocks in the stock market.

In the stock market, you face four types of risk that could cause you to incur a loss every time you trade:

  • Market risk– The possibility that you are wrong in your price speculation. You can buy a stock expecting the price to go up, but the price goes down instead and you face a loss.
  • Industry risk– The possibility that changes in an industry will affect a company’s performance. If a new technology comes out and a company can’t adapt quickly, its competitors could outpace it.
  • Regulatory risk– The possibility of regulators in a particular sector tightening regulations thus forcing companies that cannot meet the new requirements to quit or relocate to other countries. The Dunlop and Michelin Tire companies in Nigeria were affected by this risk and had to leave the country.
  • Business risk– The probability that a company will make a loss, which will lower its share price and prevent it from paying dividends to shareholders.

When trading forex in Nigeria, you encounter the following risk:

  • Counterparty risk– These are the chances that your forex broker is not licensed or even if licensed, they could embezzle your funds. This is a major risk for Nigerian forex traders as they have to patronize international brokers as the SEC has not licensed any local forex brokers and does not even support forex trading. Fraudulent forex brokers target markets like Nigeria due to lack of government regulation.
  • Leverage risk– Leverage is when you take out a loan from your broker to trade. When trading forex, you should use leverage-based products, such as the contract for difference, to benefit from fluctuating prices without buying the currency. Using too much leverage puts you at risk of losing all your capital and even owing your broker money. In countries where forex trading is regulated, governments limit the amount of leverage brokers can offer traders. However, since retail forex trading is unregulated in Nigeria, some brokers lure traders with excessive leverage and they end up losing all their capital.
  • Risk of change– The exchange rate of a currency can fall very quickly on the foreign exchange market. Reporting, politics, conflict, monetary policy, etc. could cause a currency to lose value. Sometimes, even when risk management mechanisms such as stop loss orders are deployed, exchange rates may still exceed the set stop price. This will cause you to fill your market order at a lower price than you expected and you will incur a loss. The forex market is notorious for this type of volatility.
  • Risk of failure– Statistics show that more than 85% of forex traders lose money. This is partly due to factors such as market volatility, gamification of forex trading, inadequate trading knowledge, FOMO trading, etc.

Reference

stock trading

Retail Forex Trading

Regulation

Regulated

Not regulated

Risk

Average

High

Liquidity

Average

High

In the table above, we have compared stock and currency trading in Nigeria using the three criteria of regulation, risk and liquidity.

First, stock trading is properly regulated and has an investor compensation fund, so regulation is excellent. Retail forex trading is unregulated in Nigeria, so regulation is poor.

Second, stock trading involves some manageable risk, so the risk is medium. Forex trading has a high failure rate of over 85%, high volatility, and the lack of local regulation makes it very risky, so the risk is high.

Third, trading stocks on the stock exchange provides some liquidity, but there are about 241 listed stocks to choose from, so liquidity is average. Forex trading is highly liquid with daily turnover of $6.6 trillion, so liquidity is considered high.

Online trading is a risky business because no one, not even the smartest robots, can predict market movements. With this in mind, traders should not take additional and avoidable risks. Forex trading is unregulated in Nigeria and has a high loss rate as most traders lose money. If you must trade in Nigeria, it is safer to trade on the stock market where at least there is government oversight and manageable risk.

]]>
Republican Representative Rodney Davis does not trade stocks. But that doesn’t mean he’s ready to arrest other members of Congress who do. https://radar2014.org/2022/04/05/republican-representative-rodney-davis-does-not-trade-stocks-but-that-doesnt-mean-hes-ready-to-arrest-other-members-of-congress-who-do/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 14:35:36 +0000 https://radar2014.org/2022/04/05/republican-representative-rodney-davis-does-not-trade-stocks-but-that-doesnt-mean-hes-ready-to-arrest-other-members-of-congress-who-do/ Republican Representative Rodney Davis, who is poised to have a lot of influence over members of Congress’ personal finances, said he was loath to force his colleagues to stop trading stocks. Davis, of Illinois, is the ranking Republican on the House Administration Committee, which will hold a congressional hearing on Thursday that will include discussions […]]]>

Republican Representative Rodney Davis, who is poised to have a lot of influence over members of Congress’ personal finances, said he was loath to force his colleagues to stop trading stocks.

Davis, of Illinois, is the ranking Republican on the House Administration Committee, which will hold a congressional hearing on Thursday that will include discussions on whether Congress should ban lawmakers from buying and sell individual stocks.

“I don’t want to lock myself into setting what I think are my priorities,” Davis said when asked in a recent interview if he could support a stock trading ban.

However, he left plenty of room for where he would eventually land, describing himself as being in “discovery mode” on the matter and throwing out some ideas on how to improve the rules for stock trading.

One option would be to make members’ personal finance data much more publicly available, he said.

For Davis, it is this reporting requirement alone that is enough to induce the five-term congressman to voluntarily refrain from actively trading stocks. This way, he only has to report his finances annually, not weekly or monthly.

“Filling out financial statements is a pain if you have new investments on a regular basis,” Davis said. “This type of reporting deters a lot of members like me from wanting to participate.”

But it also means, Davis said, he might not have the full picture of the matter until he hears from colleagues who choose to actively trade stocks.

These are important reasons why there is new pressure to make changes to the law.

“Playground for the rich”?

I asked Davis what he thought of two House bills that would ban lawmakers from trading individual stocks and have them place existing holdings in a blind trust.

The blind trust agreement would require lawmakers to cede control of their personal investments to an independent trustee. As expected, members of Congress would not know what directors bought or sold on their behalf until weeks or months after the fact.

While at least 10 members of Congress have already established Congress-approved qualified blind trusts, it can be costly and time-consuming to formalize. The process would be a big undertaking, especially for a politician running for the first time for the US House, a position that must be re-elected every two years.

Davis said he wanted to dive into the specifics of what members would have to do to gain blind trust, including the price they would face.

“I don’t want the House of Representatives to become a playground only for the wealthy, because many of the talking points raised include costly provisions that could cost future members of Congress,” he said. .

If Davis decides to formally oppose a stock trading ban, it could put him at odds with the top Republican in the House.

Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California is set to become Speaker of the House if Republicans regain the House in November, and he reportedly wanted to make promises of STOCK Act reforms a big part of the platform of the GOP for the midterm elections.

Davis said he hasn’t spoken directly to McCarthy about it, adding, “That doesn’t mean we won’t be on the same page when this hearing happens, because we certainly will be.”

True bipartisanship? It is to be determined.

It’s unclear how bipartisan any effort to reform the STOCK Act will be.

Republicans and Democrats on the committee told me two versions of what happened before Thursday’s hearing was scheduled.

Republicans insisted on asking Democrats if they could ask members of Congress to talk about their experiences with stock trading and what it was like to report on their finances.

Democrats deny that Republicans ever asked.

Davis also told me that he was cut off from much of the courtroom preparation. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has asked House Administration Committee Chair Zoe Lofgren to review STOCK Act compliance and consider tougher penalties for those who break the law .

Lofgren spokesman Peter Whippy said Thursday’s hearing was part of that process.

Davis said he’s glad the hearing is taking place and hopes the two sides can work out solutions together.

He stressed that the achievements of the STOCK Act should not be underestimated. The public has better access to details about politicians’ financial dealings thanks to the requirements of the law, he said.

In the meantime, if members are faced with questions from the media or elsewhere about potential conflicts of interest in the trades they do, they should be prepared to answer them, he said.

Still, Davis considered some reforms, such as improving new member orientation so that congressional ethics and disclosure rules are clearer. He said he was particularly concerned about new members of Congress who seemed to have trouble following the rules.

Two notable examples of freshmen who failed to properly disclose a large volume of stock trading are Representative Pat Fallon, a Republican from Texas, and Senator Tommy Tuberville, a Republican from Alabama.

Under the STOCK Act, members have 30 to 45 days after a stock trade to report when they, their financial advisor or their spouse have bought or sold stocks. They must also disclose the name of the stock and list, within broad ranges, the value of any stock trade.

If members do not report their transactions on time, they are supposed to face a fine. But my fellow Insiders and I have found that such fines are rarely enforced in the House. Davis said he thinks the committee should take a closer look at penalties, which are supposed to start at $200, regardless of a member’s delay in reporting trades or the value of their trades.

During our call, Davis touted his past record of transparency when it comes to US House finances. A few years ago, he was part of a task force that allowed the public to sort through Congressional office spending data.

But the public database for researching home occupations, although online, is not sortable or searchable. And a database to examine the financial transactions of top congressional staffers is not searchable, sortable, or even online, one must physically travel to the United States Capitol to access it.

I asked Davis if he had ever tried to use the existing clumsy system, and explained how difficult it had been for us reporters to weed out the data for our investigation of the “Congress in conflict”.

Davis looked surprised and said he hadn’t searched the database to see what it looked like.

“I’ll do it now that you’ve mentioned it,” he said.

]]>